» frame | home browse filter search | refresh | log on
tx   printed 22/02/2018 11:52:27 by anonymous

Welcome to tx

Thank you for trying out tx. Read more about how to get started here: github.com/stijnsanders/tx/Overview.md

View items
browse..., viewed recently..., selected recently...
Select items
filter..., filter statistics...
Search for items
search...
View changes to items
log..., advanced..., rss...
View by structure
tree..., trace..., terms..
Transport items
export..., import..., add multiple...
Configure
users..., realms..., test...

recent changes

 projects
 jsonDoc

 UBJSON

http://ubjson.org/type-reference/

weight: 0 c m

 huis

 garage: extra schap aan ketel

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 proverbs

 Don't be afraid of growing slowly, be afraid of standing still.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 psychology

 Modality effect

Memory recall is higher for the last items of a list when the list items were received via speech than when they were received through writing.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 project management

 Bike shed effect

“Parkinson’s law of triviality” The tendency to give disproportionate weight to trivial issues. This bias explains why an organization may avoid specialized or complex subjects, such as the design of a nuclear reactor, and instead focus on something easy to grasp or rewarding to the average participant, such as the design of an adjacent bike shed.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 psychology

 Delmore effect

The tendency to set much more explicit goals for low priority domains than for their most important ambitions.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 software development

 Maslow's hammer

An over-reliance on a familiar tool or methods, ignoring or under-valuing alternative approaches.
“If all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.”

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 behavioural economics

 Irrational escalation

The phenomenon where people justify increased investment in a decision, based on the cumulative prior investment, despite new evidence suggesting that the decision was probably wrong.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 behavioural economics

 Hyperbolic discounting

"Would you prefer a dollar today or three dollars tomorrow?" or "Would you prefer a dollar in one year or three dollars in one year and one day?" It has been claimed that a significant fraction of subjects will take the lesser amount today, but will gladly wait one extra day in a year in order to receive the higher amount instead.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 psychology

 Hard-easy effect

The tendency to overestimate the probability of one’s success at a task perceived as hard, and to underestimate the likelihood of one’s success at a task perceived as easy.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 psychology

 Peltzman effect

The tendency to take greater risks when perceived safety increases.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 psychology

 Rosy retrospection

The remembering of the past as having been better than it really was.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 psychology

 Spotlight effect

The tendency to overestimate the amount that other people notice your appearance or behavior.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 proverbs

 Why keep a dog and bark yourself?

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 proverbs

 Trust everybody, but always cut the cards.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 proverbs

 Yesterday is gone.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 proverbs

 To err is human.

Errare humanum est.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 proverbs

 The customer is always right.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 proverbs

 The law is tough, but it is the law.

Dura lex, sed lex.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 proverbs

 Rules are made to be broken.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 proverbs

 No matter how thin you slice it, it's still baloney.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 proverbs

 Proverbs run in pairs.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 proverbs

 Perfect is the enemy of good.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 proverbs

 It’s not the whistle that pulls the train.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 proverbs

 A spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 proverbs

 We’ll be crying all the way to the bank.

To be happy due to the receipt of money, but sad about the cause.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 proverbs

 To make an omelet, one has to break eggs.

In order to achieve something, it is inevitable and necessary that some mistakes are made or some sacrifices must occur.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck

 proverbs

weight: -200 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 behavioural economics

 Amara’s law

We tend to overestimate the effect of a technology in the short run and underestimate the effect in the long run.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 software development

 Reinventing the wheel

Duplicating a basic method that has already previously been created or optimized by others. Sometimes used without derision, when a person's activities might be perceived as merely reinventing the wheel, when they actually possess additional value.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 software development

 Eating your own dog food

A term used to reference a scenario in which an organization uses its own product. The idea is that if the organization truly believes its own product to be superior, it would use the product itself.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 software development

 If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.

Thomas Bertram "Bert" Lance was an American businessman who served as Director of the Office of Management and Budget under President Jimmy Carter. He is quoted saying this in the May 1977 issue of the magazine Nation's Business.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 software development

 You aren’t gonna need it

A principle of extreme programming that states a programmer should not add functionality until deemed necessary.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 software development

 Not invented here

A stance adopted by social, corporate, or institutional cultures that avoid using or buying already existing products, research, standards, or knowledge because of their external origins and costs, such as royalties.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 psychology

 Semmelweis reflex

The reflex-like tendency to reject new evidence or new knowledge because it contradicts established norms, beliefs or paradigms.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 psychology

 Status quo bias

A preference for the current state of affairs. The current baseline (status quo) is taken as a reference point, and any change from that baseline is perceived as a loss.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 psychology

 Naïve realism

The human tendency to believe that we see the world around us objectively, and that people who disagree with us must be uninformed, irrational, or biased.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 proverbs

 Math class is tough! Want to go shopping?

The original “Teen Talk Barbie” contained a voice box programmed with a random assortment of four phrases out of 270 possibilities, including "Wanna have a pizza party?", "Want to go shopping?", "Okay, meet me at the mall" and "Math class is tough."

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck

 Buzzword

Often derived from a technical term yet often has much of the original technical meaning removed through fashionable use, being simply used to impress others; although may still have the full meaning when used in certain technical contexts.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 psychology

 Tunnel Vision

The reluctance to consider alternatives to one's preferred line of thought.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 psychology

 Pollyanna principle

The tendency for people to remember pleasant items more accurately than unpleasant ones.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 psychology

 Barnum effect

A common psychological phenomenon whereby individuals give high accuracy ratings to descriptions of their personality that supposedly are tailored specifically to them but that are, in fact, vague and general enough to apply to a wide range of people.

Also known as the Forer effect.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 behavioural economics

 Sturgeon’s revelation

Ninety percent of everything is crud.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 behavioural economics

 Pareto principle

For many events, roughly 80% of the effects come from 20% of the causes.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 project management

 Feature creep

The ongoing expansion or addition of new features in a product. These extra features go beyond the basic function of the product and can result in software bloat and over-complication.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 project management

 Second-system effect

The tendency of small, elegant, and successful systems, to be succeeded by over-engineered, bloated systems, due to inflated expectations and overconfidence.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 software development

 KISS principle

“Keep it simple, stupid”: Most systems work best if they are kept simple rather than made complicated; therefore simplicity should be a key goal in design and unnecessary complexity should be avoided.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 software development

 Zero-One-Infinity Rule

Allow none of foo, one of foo, or any number of foo.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck

 Murphy’s Law

If there are two or more ways to do something, and one of those ways can result in a catastrophe, then someone will do it.

weight: 0 c m

 Gentle Advice Deck
 software development

 Lubarsky’s Law

“Lubarsky’s Law of Cybernetic Entomology”: There is always one more bug.

weight: 0 c m

 xxm

Learn about xxm and how it enables you to use the speed and power of the Delphi compiler to build robust web solutions.

 sandbox

test! this is an item on the homepage, in the margin on the right